Everyday People

TDR_largeBy Kylar Broadus

Transgender Day of Remembrance is important to observe each year for everyone. It’s an opportunity for the world to take note of the rash of anti-transgender violence plaguing our community. But especially for trans people of color, it is a moment to pause and be mindful of those whom we have lost in tragic ways, and to mourn these losses of human life as a means to continue healing and rebuilding ourselves and our communities. We must also use this as a call to action to educate and raise awareness of the need to stop the violence perpetuated against all transgender people but particularly those of color, including in our own communities of color.

The National Anti-Violence Project (NCAVP) shows that trans people of color are the most targeted due to race and lack of conformity of our gender identities and presentations to the greater society. In fact, according to the NCAVP 40 percent of the fatal attacks against the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community in 2011 specifically targeted trans women, particularly trans women of color. It’s this combination that seems to make us more susceptible to hate violence, which can come in many forms.

Continue reading on the Huffington Post.

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White House Observes Transgender Day of Remembrance

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Kylar Broadus was among a group of transgender community advocates that met with White House staff to mark Transgender Day of Remembrance and discuss ways in which the Administration can work together to ensure dignity, equality, and justice for all people. At the meeting, community leaders highlighted a range of issues and concerns of importance to transgender people.

“In the months and years ahead, we look forward to working to ensure the safety and wellbeing of all transgender people,” said Gautam Raghavan, an associate director in the Office of Public Engagement.